Who were the Broadcast 41?

Why did images of white, nuclear families dominate television in the 1950s? Why has it taken nearly 70 years for images of a diverse America—featuring people of color, immigrants, women as independent social beings—to appear on prime time television?  Challenging the longstanding belief that what appeared on television screens in the 1950s and after resulted from some social consensus, The Broadcast 41 addresses these and other questions by telling two intersecting stories.

Dorothy Parker Finally Gets a Final Resting Place

Dorothy Parker was a lifelong defender of civil rights and civil liberties. When she died, she left her estate to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as this article describes. After his assassination, her cremated remains variously resided in a crematory in Westchester County, a Manhattan lawyer's office, , a garden outside NAACP headquarters.

First Black Broadway Hit--"Shuffle Along"--at 100

Fredi Washington, Paul Robeson, Josephine Baker, and many others all had roles in the 1921 Broadway hit, Shuffle Along, the first Broadway hit written, composed and performed by African Americans. Author and teacher Caseen Gaines has a new book about this and other influential Black productions: Footnotes: The Black Artists Who Rewrote the Rules of the Great White Way.

Hazel Scott: "I sued and I won and I gave all the money to the NAACP"

Terrific article on Hazel Scott by biographer Karen Chilton. In 1950, Scott brought a successful lawsuit against a restaurant near Spokane, Washington, where she and a traveling companion had been denied service, the waitress told them, because they were Negroes.[fn]Hazel Scott Attorneys Score in Initial Round, Spokane Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1950.

Shirley Graham and the Fight against Global White Supremacy

Benjamin Talton reminds us about problematic US record on fighting global white supremacy. Cites "African American activists’ steadfast opposition to authoritarianism and white supremacy at home and abroad offer lessons for the U.S. government," especially Cold War dissenters like Shirley Graham and W.E.B. Du Bois.

Shirley Graham Getting Attention She has Long Deserved

Not only were parts of Shirley Graham's opera Tom-Tom performed last month, Boston's Castle of our Skins, producer of concerts and other cultural programming that celebrates Black excellence in classical music, just filled its inaugural Shirley Graham creative-in-residence position, which was awarded to composer and scholar